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A UK woman who was attacked by a bison at Custer State Park in South Dakota is speaking out about the ordeal.

In an interview with Quota on Tuesday, 19-year-old Amelia Dean June said she was hiking in the park with a friend when the attack happened.

Dean recalled that after walking around the male bison, which was only yards away, it ran toward them.

“I could put my hand on his forehead without it being fully stretched,” she reported to the station.

Pennsylvania woman mauled by buffalo in Yellowstone, 2nd visitor this week

A pair of bison at South Dakota's Custer State Park

A pair of bison at South Dakota’s Custer State Park
(Photo: Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Just then The animal hit her thigh With the horn, sending Dean flying.

“I remember feeling the pressure on my hips. I remember feeling my hips thrust back and flying through the air and going on my heels,” she explained, adding that the bison’s hooves were right over her head.

The blow severed her femoral artery, resulting in paralysis from the knee down her leg.

“I basically have no movement in my foot. I can’t walk without a walker or crutches. I can’t walk very far, about 20 meters, and I’m done for a long time,” she said.

A sign for Buffalo Corrals at Custer State Park in South Dakota

A sign for Buffalo Corrals at Custer State Park in South Dakota
(Photo: Getty Images via Education Images/Universal Images Group)

Man mauled by Yellowstone bison

Dean’s incident is not the only reported plover attack at the park this year.

Three people were mauled by bison in June in Yellowstone National Park.

The National Park Service warns parkers to give wild animals room to move.

Bison grazing at Custer State Park, South Dakota

Bison grazing at Custer State Park, South Dakota
(Photo: Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

“Most parks require you to stay at least 25 yards from most wildlife and 100 yards from predators like bears and wolves,” it wrote in an Instagram post. “Remember to treat wildlife with proper care and respect. The safety of these animals, as well as yours, depends on everyone using good judgment.”

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Park Service officials want visitors to be safe and keep wildlife safe.

Bison injure more people in Yellowstone National Park than any other animal.

People should always stay at least 25 yards away from unpredictable animals; They can run three times faster than humans.