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After four people were struck by lightning outside the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday this week — two of whom died from their injuries and were pronounced dead — the public focused on the harm and danger that lightning strikes can pose.

How do you keep yourself safe?

What do you need to know about lightning to protect yourself?

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An interesting point: Men are more likely to be struck by lightning than women – because they are more involved in outdoor activities like fishing, boating, golfing, and are therefore more exposed.

Over the past five years, lightning has killed an average of 17 people in the US.

Also, outdoor construction jobs and similar “more labor-related work” make men more vulnerable to lightning, said Derek DeRoche, the National Weather Service’s severe weather program coordinator. “Fox Weather Sunrise” last month

A video shows the moment a truck was struck by lightning in Tampa, Florida.

A video shows the moment a truck was struck by lightning in Tampa, Florida.
(via Michael May Whalen Storyful)

According to Fox Weather, over the past five years, there have been an average of 17 lightning-related deaths in the US, but that rate has been dropping steadily since the turn of the century.

“This is a credit to decades of work by the National Lightning Safety Council and the National Weather Service,” FOX Weather reported, “to highlight the dangers of lightning and what you can do to stay safe.”

Warmer weather that lures us outside during thunderstorms increases the potential risk of lightning.

“When we started this effort in 2001, the 10-year average US lightning fatality rate was 55 fatalities per year,” said John Jensenius with the National Lightning Safety Council. Fox weather.

“That 10-year average is now down to 23.”

Thunder, lightning and rain during a summer storm.

Thunder, lightning and rain during a summer storm.
(iStock)

Here’s some other general information about lightning and staying safe.

Warmer weather that lures us outside during thunderstorms increases the potential risk of lightning.

Thunderstorms According to the National Weather Service, they kill about 25 million people a year and an average of 47 in the United States.

“A significant number of lightning deaths occur after a thunderstorm has passed.”

“Although most lightning strikes occur in the summer, people can be struck at any time of the year,” the NWS said.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as Fox News Digital previously reported, “most lightning deaths occur early in a clearing storm, with a significant number of lightning deaths occurring after the thunderstorms have passed”.

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“If thunder is heard – the storm is close to a lightning strike.”

More tips to stay safe

If you’re outdoors and hearing thunder, move as soon as possible to a “substantial” building with electricity or plumbing, or to an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with the windows fully rolled up, the National Weather Service advises.

Lightning lit up the sky over lower Manhattan as a bolt struck One World Trade Center on August 22, 2017, as seen from Hoboken, NJ.

Lightning lit up the sky over lower Manhattan as a bolt struck One World Trade Center on August 22, 2017, as seen from Hoboken, NJ.
(Fox News/Gary Hershorn)

If indoors, stay away from phones, computers and other electronic devices with cords that provide direct contact with electricity.

In addition to avoiding plumbing such as sinks, baths and faucets, officials recommend staying away from windows and doors — and not lying on concrete floors or leaning against concrete walls.

During a thunderstorm, get outside and stay away from water sources.

Based on a review of cases from 2006 to 2018, nearly two-thirds of lightning-related deaths occurred during outdoor recreational activities, NOAA said.

For those caught outside without access to safe shelter, officials offer the following tips to help reduce the risk of an accident.

Never sleep on the ground or take shelter under a lone tree.

Never take shelter on a hill or rocky underhang.

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Avoid high places.

During a thunderstorm, get outside and stay away from water bodies.

Stay away from objects that conduct electricity, such as power lines and barbwire fences.

Fox Weather, as well as Travis Fedshun and James Rogers, contributed to this report.