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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis took aim at San Francisco, calling the city a “dumpster fire” while expressing fears over what would happen if companies there relocated to Florida.

“There is cause for concern,” DeSantis said during an event Monday. “Texas would have all these companies moved from California over the years. So you’d have companies move from San Francisco to Austin, and they’d bring hundreds of employees with them. And those employees would vote the exact same way they voted that turned San Francisco into the dumpster fire that it is. “

DNC CHAIR JAIME HARRISON CALLS FLORIDA GOV. DESANTIS ‘THE LITTLE DEVIL’

DeSantis expressed fears that California voters could begin moving to Florida, saying they fail to make the connection between “leftist” policies and the problems they left behind.

Florida Gov.  Ron DeSantis

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis
(AP Photo / Phelan M. Ebenhack)

“It’s like the leftism, they will not draw the connection between their leftist ideology and the destruction that’s all around them,” DeSantis said. “It’s a problem because I do think there’s a class of voters who would come to Florida, and they would continue to vote the same way.”

The Republican governor’s comments come as many high-profile companies and entrepreneurs in the technology industry have either expressed interest in, or already have, moved from California to Texas and Florida.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis
(Fox News)

Among the most high-profile movers was Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who moved from California to Texas last year and has publicly floated the idea of ​​moving Tesla’s headquarters with him. While a Tesla move to Texas hasn’t happened yet, the company has invested in a large facility close to Austin and appears poised to make Texas a priority.

Elon Musk McNamee / Getty Images)

Elon Musk McNamee / Getty Images)
(Win McNamee / Getty Images)

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The comments also come at the same time as Musk officially made a deal to purchase Twitter, another high-profile company currently with headquarters in California.