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Chicago’s elected Democrat remained silent when asked by Fox News Digital how he planned to reduce the number of arrests and police morale in the city as crime spikes starting in 2020.

Chicago police made 12% of arrests for crimes in 2021, the lowest rate since 2001, because of major changes in how the department patrols the streets in recent years, including limiting their vehicle pursuit policies and ending foot pursuits if there are suspects. run by an officer or if one commits a minor offence.

Fox News Digital reached out to the offices of Illinois Governor JB Pritzker, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Fox multiple times to comment on how to reduce arrests and reduce police morale, but did not receive a response. Response as of press time.

Chicago is done Shaken by crime In recent years. After a decline in violence over the previous three years, the city witnessed an increase in homicides in 2020. The Windy City had nearly 770 homicides in 2020, a 50% increase from 2019. Last year, the city broke a 25-year-old record when it surpassed 800 homicides, the Chicago Tribune reported.

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FILE - Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks during a press conference at City Hall, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021.

FILE – Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks during a press conference at City Hall, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021.
(Erin Hoole/Chicago Tribune via AP)

So far this year, shootings and homicides are down 17% and 10%, respectively, in the first half of 2022. However, the city is still on pace to break the 600-homicide benchmark by the end of the year, WTTW reported this month.

The number of traffic stops and tickets has also decreased, and the number of investigative stops has decreased by more than 50% between 2019 and 2021. Additionally, a Chicago-Sun Times analysis found that fewer crimes are being reported to police by residents and authorities. Roads.

“I’m not shocked that our governor, mayor and state’s attorney refuse to comment,” Alderman Anthony Napolitano of Chicago’s 41st Ward told Fox News Digital. “Their policies have led to an increase in crime and a decrease in arrests.”

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Illinois Governor JB Pritzker greets the crowd during the Chicago Pride Parade, Sunday, June 26, 2022, in Chicago.

Illinois Governor JB Pritzker greets the crowd during the Chicago Pride Parade, Sunday, June 26, 2022, in Chicago.
(AP Photo/John Durr)

“Just look at the Illinois State’s recently passed crime bill, ‘The Safe-T-Act,’ or the Chicago Police Department’s most recent policy on foot pursuits, and don’t forget the State Attorney’s track record of reducing serious crime rates. ,” Napolitano added. “It’s all disgusting.”

Napolitano added that the situation in Chicago reflects a “political strategy” inspired by the socialist wing of the Democratic Party.

“Socialists are implementing policies that handcuff our police officers and prevent them from doing their job,” Napolitano said. “Then, when crime gets out of control, they blame the police. There’s more than one way to skin a cat, it’s a new script to cheat the police. The ultimate goal is to destroy our police department and enforce their own.”

In this Feb. 22, 2019 file photo, Cook County State's Attorney Kim Fox speaks during a news conference in Chicago.

In this Feb. 22, 2019 file photo, Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Fox speaks during a news conference in Chicago.
(AP Photo/Kichiro Sato, File)

Along with rising crime, lenient sentencing policies that release violent criminals back onto the streets make police officers think twice before arresting some criminals.

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A Chicago police official told the Chicago Sun-Times last week that officers are hesitant to interact with “criminals with guns” because of prosecutors’ tight grip on approving serious charges against criminals.

“In the past, I would see a guy with a gun in his waistband and I would jump out and chase him,” an officer told the outlet. “I won’t do that now.”

Retired Chicago Police Department Chief of Detectives Eugene Roy told Fox News Digital Morale in the department is somewhat depressed as officials believe that elected officials are not backing down.

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“There’s a fear among police officers that if they do the right thing, political or other considerations, racial considerations may come into play and they’re going to be jammed, fired, criminally charged for doing the right thing,” Roy said.

Fox News’ Emma Colton contributed to this report.