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Ground hogs are definitely like Formula One.

A groundhog or marmot raced onto the track at Circuit Gillesville Newway in Montreal on Friday during Formula One Canadian Grand Prix practice.

The rat racing appeared next to the surface, but decided to cross it.

It went between the cars of Fernando Alonso and Carlos Size and was almost hit by the Ferrari of Science.

Luckily for all the animals involved, it was able to weave its way through the cars and be able to safely add it to the other side.

Lance Strol's Aston Martin AMR22 Mercedes circuit comes close to groundhog at Gillesvillenew.

Lance Strol’s Aston Martin AMR22 Mercedes circuit comes close to groundhog at Gillesvillenew.
(Clive Rose / Getty Images)

This is not the first time one of the critters has checked the scene during Formula One’s annual visit to the track.

Louis Hamilton, a British McLaren Formula One driver, was driving his McLaren MP4-23 during the rehearsals for the 2008 Canadian Grand Prix at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, Canada on June 6, 2008.  (Photo by Darren Hease)

Louis Hamilton, a British McLaren Formula One driver, was driving his McLaren MP4-23 during the rehearsals for the 2008 Canadian Grand Prix at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, Canada on June 6, 2008. (Photo by Darren Hease)

They are most common on the island of Notre Dame, which has a track. An altercation broke out during practice for the 2008 race and Louis Hamilton was photographed approaching it as he fled.

Formula One is not the only series dealing with adventure animals. While practicing for the Indy 500 this year, a fox crossed the track in front of fast moving cars and jumped through the catch fence as soon as the yellow flag was raised.

The Canadian Grand Prix, which has been canceled for the past two years due to the coronavirus epidemic, will return to Montreal this year for the first time since 2019.

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It is scheduled to start at 2pm ET on Sunday, June 19, as long as the local fauna allows.