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Shocking video captured a body of water crashing onto a small island in Maryland Thursday as severe weather ravaged the Old Line State’s coast.

The video shows the hurricane moving over the water and moving from the Chesapeake Bay toward Smith Island.

The video, taken by Amy and Daniel Somers, shows debris flying into the air as the water source approaches land.

You can hear Somers’ loud gasps as they see a stream of water coming to shore and what appears to be a building.

A waterspout devastated Smith Island in Maryland on Thursday.  In the video, it can be seen crashing onto the small island and throwing up debris.

A waterspout devastated Smith Island in Maryland on Thursday. In the video, it can be seen crashing onto the small island and throwing up debris.
(Amy Somers)

Significant damage to structures and property has been reported on Smith Island, but there is no word yet on injuries to residents of the tiny island.

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Photos show several Smith Island homes completely destroyed by the storm, with debris piling up on lawns.

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan warned residents to stay inside in a statement on Twitter.

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“Please stay off roads in affected areas – especially anywhere tree clearing crews need to work,” he said.

Governor Hogan also noted that more than 50,000 power outages have been reported in Maryland.

The National Weather Service had issued a 45 mph wind and possible hail warning.

Smith Island – which makes up the communities of Tylerton, Rhodes Point and Ewell – has a population of less than 300. It is the only island without a bridge connecting it to the mainland.

The Chesapeake Bay includes many communities - Smith Island is the only one that does not have a bridge to the mainland.

The Chesapeake Bay includes many communities – Smith Island is the only one that does not have a bridge to the mainland.
(AP)

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The island has drawn attention for significant erosion in recent memory, losing hundreds of residents and thousands of acres of land. The island, which was first settled in the 17th century, is dotted with abandoned properties.

In 2013, the Maryland government proposed to use Hurricane Sandy relief to buy out the remaining homeowners on the island.