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The trial began Tuesday for a Texas man who allegedly killed his two daughters in a 2008 “honor killing,” spending the next 12 years as a fugitive on the FBI’s most wanted list.

Yasser Abdel Said, 65, is on trial for murder and faces an automatic life sentence if convicted because prosecutors are not seeking the death penalty.

Said, an Egyptian immigrant, is accused of killing his daughters Amina, 18, and Sarah, 17, because they were “too American.” His wife Patricia Owens previously told Fox News that Said was angry that his daughters had non-Muslim boyfriends. He said he “didn’t want to be raised as a whore,” Owens said. She divorced him after killing the girls.

Said took the girls out under the guise of going to a local restaurant in Lewisville, Texas on New Year’s Day, but instead drove them to Irving, Texas and allegedly shot them in his taxi.

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Yasser Abdel Said, 65, is on trial for capital murder for killing his teenage daughters.

Yasser Abdel Said, 65, is on trial for capital murder for killing his teenage daughters.
(FBI)

Sarah was able to call 911 before she died. “Help, my father shot me! I’m dying, I’m dying!” she said Amina is understood to have died instantly.

“This is a maniac of possession and control,” prosecutor Lorraine Black told the court on Tuesday.

Amina’s boyfriend testified that he “knew she was going to die” when she reluctantly went home on New Year’s Day after eloping with her mother, sister and their boyfriends to Tulsa, Oklahoma. He told him that her last words were that she would never see him again. She returned home on January 1, 2008, and was murdered the same night.

On New Year’s Day 2008, the bodies of Amina and Sara were found riddled with bullets in their father’s cab parked outside a hotel in Irving.

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The girls and their mother left their home before Christmas 2007 after their father put a gun to Amina’s head, prosecutors said.

Mugshots of Yasser Abdel Said, center, his son Islam, left, and brother Yassin, right.  Both Islam and Yasin were arrested for harboring a fugitive.

Mugshots of Yasser Abdel Said, center, his son Islam, left, and brother Yassin, right. Both Islam and Yasin were arrested for harboring a fugitive.
(Irving Police Department)

Amina’s history teacher testified that the 18-year-old had emailed her about her plans to run away from home, writing, “He will, without any drama or suspicion, kill us,” telling the teacher to keep her plans quiet until she left. home, according to the Dallas Morning News.

“These were two young, energetic young women,” Black said. “Normal teenage girls who wanted a normal life.”

After they settled in Tulsa, their mother, Patricia Owens, and Sarah decided to return home for New Year’s. Amina returns in fear.

Sarah, left, and Amina said during the happy hour.

Sarah, left, and Amina said during the happy hour.
(Facebook)

Said’s defense lawyers said the police did not thoroughly investigate the murder and focused only on him as a suspect.

“Instead of investigating murder, they were investigating Yeure,” said attorney Joseph Patton. “The evidence cannot and will not support a conviction for capital murder.”

Said fled after the murder and was found 30 miles away from the crime scene in 2020. His son Islam, who was 19 at the time, and his brother Yasin were both convicted of harboring a known fugitive. Yasin was sentenced to 12 years and Islam to 10 years.

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“My daughters were loving, caring, smart, loved everybody, would help anybody,” Owens told the Dallas Morning News after Said’s arrest. ‘They were two of the most amazing children in the world and they didn’t deserve what happened to them. “

Honor killing is usually carried out on a family member who is believed to have disrespected a relative. Such killings and violence, which usually see men victimizing their wives and daughters for insulting their faith, are among the most secretive crimes in society. experts told Fox News in 2015.

Fox News’ Greg Norman contributed to this report.