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A Republican U.S. spokesman said he believed abortion rights activists were involved in sabotage in sharing his campaign office with an anti-abortion group in southern Michigan.

The bomber struck shortly after noon in Jackson, Michigan, destroying the building’s windows and front door, U.S. spokesman Tim Wallberg said in a statement. Jackson is 80 miles (130 kilometers) west of Detroit.

A sign near the building’s entrance was spray-painted with pink paint and two windows were broken, Jackson Police and Fire Services Director Elmer Hitt told MLive.com.

There was no evidence that anyone had entered the building and no suspects had been identified, the hit added.

Wallberg, from Tipton, said the spray-painted message appeared to indicate destruction by abortion rights advocates. Wallberg said he was opposed to abortion.

The Michigan government has filed a lawsuit to overturn the Whitmer state abortion ban

Jackson shared the building with his campaign office, Right to Life.

Other destructive events affecting anti-abortion have been reported in the US since the leak of the draft opinion indicating that the US Supreme Court is ready to overturn the 1973 Roy v. Wade ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.

U.S. Rep. Tim Wahlberg, tenant of the demolished Michigan building, blamed abortion rights activists for his campaign.

U.S. Rep. Tim Wahlberg, tenant of the demolished Michigan building, blamed abortion rights activists for his campaign.
(Bill Clark / CQ roll call)

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Nearly a dozen windows and three glass doors shattered Monday morning at the Lennon Pregnancy Center in Dearborn Heights. Someone spray-painted: “If abortions are not safe, neither are you.”

“It’s not an isolated incident. It’s not a coincidence,” Gary Hillbrand, center board president, told the Detroit Free Press.

13 states have automatic trigger laws that automatically ban most or all abortions if the Supreme Court rescinds Row v.

The Associated Press sent out a message Thursday asking for comment from Dearborn Heights police.

Some abortion providers and law enforcement agencies are also preparing to increase violence after the Supreme Court announced its official ruling, which is set to happen soon.